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Author Topic: The mythical “locking headgear”  (Read 24552 times)

Offline DemBones

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The mythical “locking headgear”
« on: 09. July 2010, 16:44:50 PM »
I have seen a few posts mentioning locked headgear.  Has anyone actually managed this?  As in really managed this – IE a headgear that can be locked on, and only be removed with a key? Or is this just another fantasy?  "wired in" does not count, I'm afraid...

And if so, how?

Offline teasy1869

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Re: The mythical “locking headgear”
« Reply #1 on: 09. July 2010, 21:07:03 PM »
I am almost sure that this is just a fantasy (or a fake). I cant believe that a "technology" like this would be accepted by patients. You can about it here and there in the internet - but I never found evidence.

Offline simcaptain

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Re: The mythical “locking headgear”
« Reply #2 on: 12. July 2010, 16:59:42 PM »
Well, from the point of view of technology - there are those facebows that have 'safety locks'. It probably wouldn't be difficult to block these locks in the 'closed' position, e.g. with a wire.  >:D  Somehow, though, I too can't see anyone actually doing this...  ;) ;D

SC
Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans. (John Lennon, Beautiful Boy)

Offline DemBones

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Re: The mythical “locking headgear”
« Reply #3 on: 14. July 2010, 13:35:28 PM »
I think I have found a way to do this.  Note, I said “Think”.  I’m going to give it a tryout, and if it works, will post pictures here.   

tingrin

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Re: The mythical “locking headgear”
« Reply #4 on: 14. July 2010, 20:06:50 PM »
I think you gave the impression that you were asking if it could be done from a clinical perspective... which would not fly beyond fantasy!

From a technical perspective, it would be pretty easy, especially with an older style strap headgear. Just weld the outer tips of the facebow to make closed loops instead of open ends. Then use two small hasp style locks and weld a d-ring to each one, on the end opposite the hasp. The strap threads through the rings and would be tensioned as normal. Be sure to fix the clasp so it can't be loosened by your non-compliant patient!  >:D

The facebow would be fitted into the tubes and the strap with the locks attach to the ends, effectively locking the strap in place with two highly visible locks!

Using a "safety lock" style of facebow as well would be a very good idea, since it would be a bad situation if the inner bow ends came out of the tubes, (and no way to loosen or remove the strap). Optionally, put a couple of turns of wire to keep them closed, (as previously suggested), and you have perfect headgear compliance!

Offline DemBones

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Re: The mythical “locking headgear”
« Reply #5 on: 15. July 2010, 14:40:18 PM »
Good news/bad news situation.  I’ve managed it, but….

Oaky, firstly, I’ve attached two straps to the ends of my facebow.  Clear plastic straps with a few reinforced eyelets.  Then I bent the headgear hooks shut (a Leatherman tool is such a handy thing to have!)so that straps cannot be unhooked from the ends of the facebow. 

So now you have a facebow with two straps hanging from the end.  Attach headgear to facebow as per normal (elastics on my high-pull slips through the hooks even when bent closed to keep the straps locked in place) Bring the loose ends of the straps together behind the neck, and padlock together through the t-piece at the neck of the headgear – ta-dah!  Headgear locked in!

Or is it…  I’ve discovered no matter how tightly I padlock my facebow in, I can always slip it out of the buccal tubes.  And I can slip it out of my mouth.  Thus it’s technically “removable”.  (Also, if it’s too tight around the head to try and make it “un-removable” it gets really uncomfortable, and then I just want out and all the fun is out of the game – its better for me to have a bit of slack – I want to feel the headgear, not the locks.).  However, because the straps are still locked round my neck, and connected to the headgear itself, it still sits round my neck like a collar, and there is this big mass of webbing hanging down my neck.  In case no one noticed, headgear inner-bows are sharp, and when tied round the neck it pokes nastily at the throat…  so ‘tis easier to just wear the darn thing in the mouth as it was meant to, than it is to remove and wear it round the neck. Which can be a blessing really – the facebow can then be removed for cleaning and eating, but provides enough discomfort to put it back where it belongs when lunchtime is up!

I’ll see if I can take some pics sometime next week to show.  I’d call this myth “confirmed”.

ceebee

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Re: The mythical “locking headgear”
« Reply #6 on: 17. July 2010, 22:09:15 PM »
This isn’t a ‘locking’ headgear like with requiring a key to open, but a friend of mine had a lock-on hg used  on his son during  his treatment.  The lad was stubborn better put bull-headed about wearing it as required, slipping it off as soon as a parent turned his back! It didn’t take very long for dad and the ortho to be at wits end, the ortho declaring if he didn’t get more cooperation he’d stop treatment, dad worried about the boy’s health in 20 years, no less the $ 3000.00 plus investment he was watching going down the drain. The ortho suggested the locking hg option.

It was an almost standard highpull hg with a modified face bow, the face bow had safety locks that hooked behind the molar bands, and on the outer bow right at the ends the hooks for connecting the traction straps,  the ortho welded small u shaped clasps on the bow. The ortho supplied dad with baggies of small nylon Cable Ties, the same thing used for bundling multilple electrical wires together. A side note, once tightened the only way to remove these ties is to cut them, they cannot be reused.

Each time Junior put his headgear in mom or dad would slip a Cable Ties though the clasps on each side of the face bow and tighten it, sealing the hook the tractions straps were connected to. Once that was done the only way to remove the device was to cut the ties. The boy was informed that, short of the worst of emergencies imaginable, any damage to either of the cable ties would cost him a TOTAL loss of freedom, and a fairly large chunk of his ass.

It worked quiet well, Junior only tested them once (“a cable tie fell off…”) and is getting through the hg phase of his treatment a little sooner than the ortho predicted so far.

Offline ukbraces

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Re: The mythical “locking headgear”
« Reply #7 on: 10. September 2010, 01:42:26 AM »
I am sure technically this can be done, but I don't imagien any orthodontist woudl do it for safety reasons - if someoen had an accident they wouldn't want the legal case!

mshelmor

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Re: The mythical “locking headgear”
« Reply #8 on: 30. September 2010, 16:28:50 PM »
I know a guy whose mother would use tape to 'lock' his facebow on.  She would put it where the strap met the metal.  If he took it off, she knew.  More of a mental lock than anything else.  But he said it worked, he had to wear it much more than he ever wanted to.

ceebee

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Re: The mythical “locking headgear”
« Reply #9 on: 01. October 2010, 16:41:50 PM »
I've heard if taped ub hg, but never seen it. It seems like would work, esp if the kid knows better than to disobey his parents.

Actually UK, it was the ortho's idea (the cable tie locking hg). I dont see any safety issue, as I stated the facebow had the safety latches at the molars so the facebow couldn't come dislodged. Like taping the hg on the cable ties could be cut in an emergency, but the parents would know if they had.

Offline DemBones

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Re: The mythical “locking headgear”
« Reply #10 on: 25. October 2010, 11:14:44 AM »
I'm trying out the "locking headgear" today.  It promises to be quite an interesting experience.  Got my high-pull in, and a lovely lady friend came along this AM before she went to work, and padlocked it - can't take it off now. 

The keys to the padlock is in turn locked with a combination lock in a locker, so in order to remove the headgear, I need the lock combination.  This will only be given to me once a certain time period (at this stage unknown to me) and/or work-related tasks and duties have been completed.  IE: today I'm productive in my work or else I'm gonna sit for a while with this thing in my mouth - and i'm certainly not going to the pub tonight!

Tried to take pics - but its hard to take a photo behind your head! 

lb

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Re: The mythical “locking headgear”
« Reply #11 on: 29. November 2010, 00:04:24 AM »
I wonder if an orthodontist would attach a bow that only the orthodontist could remove if a patient requested it.

ceebee

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Re: The mythical “locking headgear”
« Reply #12 on: 29. November 2010, 20:39:13 PM »
Orthos can wire in facebows,  I think this practice was more 'popular' a few years ago, mostly for not complying with wear requirements and/or at parents' request. This happened to two of my sons friends in the 90's (at different times) one of them was wired in through a summer vacation, the other for about 4 months during the school year. I will say it did wonders for the 'bracefaced' kids in their group, both my boys and others quickly began wearing headgear and other appliances much more, I'm sure not wanting the same fate.

Offline brenner

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Re: The mythical “locking headgear”
« Reply #13 on: 17. December 2013, 23:08:53 PM »
My headgear is fixed. My girlfriend is a dentist and she fixed my facebow so I can not withdraw. It is a soldier.
It still exists. I'm proof of that.

Offline chrissie

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Re: The mythical “locking headgear”
« Reply #14 on: 18. December 2013, 11:57:27 AM »
My headgear is fixed. My girlfriend is a dentist and she fixed my facebow so I can not withdraw. It is a soldier.
It still exists. I'm proof of that.
How about some evidence?